Random Terrain

Useful Inventions

Favorite Quotes

Game Design

Atari 2600

Personal Pages

Quotes on Children and Parenting
Opinionated quotations from the famous and not-so-famous.

 

Having children makes one no more a parent than having a piano makes you a pianist.

Michael Levine

I bet I would have been a lot calmer and less 'crazy' as a teen if I would have been taking a B complex every day.

Duane Alan Hahn

The brain has the consistency of soft butter, custard, tofusomewhere between egg whites and JELL-O. That's why we shouldn't let children hit soccer balls with their head, and football is a dangerous brain sport, as boxing is, obviously.

Daniel G. Amen, M.D. (from The Early Show on CBS, October 11, 2005)

You want to be a parent? Shut up and do your job.

'Dr. Robert Romano' from E.R. (Oct. 18, 2001)

Most of us became parents long before we have stopped being children.

Mignon McLaughlin

Adults find pleasure in deceiving a child. They consider it necessary, but they also enjoy it. The children very quickly figure it out and then practice deception themselves.

Elias Canetti

Parents are the last people on earth who ought to have children.

Samuel Butler

Parents are not quite interested in justice, they are interested in quiet.

Bill Cosby

The most loving parents and relatives commit murder with smiles on their faces. They force us to destroy the person we really are: a subtle kind of murder.

Jim Morrison

We cannot fashion our children after our desires, we must have them and love them as God has given them to us.

Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe

We inevitably doom our children to failure and frustration when we try to set their goals for them.

Dr. Jess Lair

The fundamental defect with fathers is that they want their children to be a credit to them.

Bertrand Russell

You may give them your love but not your thoughts, for they have their own thoughts. You may house their bodies but not their souls, for their souls dwell in the house of tomorrow, which you cannot visit, not even in your dreams.

Kahlil Gibran

Do not train a child to learn by force or harshness; but direct them to it by what amuses their minds, so that you may be better able to discover with accuracy the peculiar bent of the genius of each.

Plato

Children should be led into the right paths, not by severity, but by persuasion.

Terence

The pressures of being a parent are equal to any pressure on earth. To be a conscious parent, and really look to that little being's mental and physical health, is a responsibility which most of us, including me, avoid most of the time because it's too hard.

John Lennon

Your children need your presence more than your presents.

Jesse Jackson

If you bungle raising your children, I don't think whatever else you do well matters very much.

Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis

If the only tool you have is a hammer, you tend to see every problem as a nail.

Abraham H. Maslow

Train the parent and spare the child.

Duane Alan Hahn

Children need models rather than critics.

Joseph Joubert

Children are apt to live up to what you believe of them.

Lady Bird Johnson

A torn jacket is soon mended, but hard words bruise the heart of a child.

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

Alas, regardless of their doom, the little victims play! No sense have they of ills to come nor care beyond today.

Thomas Gray

What is done to children, they will do to society.

Karl A. Menninger

Children need love, especially when they do not deserve it.

Harold S. Hubert

Always be nice to your children because they are the ones who will choose your rest home.

Phyllis Diller

To bring up a child in the way he should go, travel that way yourself.

Josh Billings

Your children will see what you're all about by what you live rather than what you say.

Dr. Wayne Dyer

Live so that when your children think of fairness and integrity, they think of you.

H. Jackson Brown Jr.

Setting an example is not the main means of influencing another, it is the only means.

Albert Einstein

Children are unpredictable. You never know what inconsistency they're going to catch you in next.

Franklin P. Jones

Children need guidance and sympathy far more than instruction.

Anne Sullivan

The best way to make children good is to make them happy.

Oscar Wilde

Many things can wait; the child cannot. Now is the time his bones are being formed, his mind is being developed. To him we cannot say tomorrow; his name is today.

Gabriela Mistral

The first duty to children is to make them happy. If you have not made them so, you have wronged them. No other good they may get can make up for that.

Charles Buxton

You are the bows from which your children, as living arrows, are sent forth.

Kahlil Gibran

Love gives all and requires nothing.

God from Conversations with God (Book 2) through Neale Donald Walsch

I have found the best way to give advice to your children is to find out what they want and then advise them to do it.

Harry S. Truman

Listen to the desires of your children. Encourage them and then give them the autonomy to make their own decision.

Denis Waitley

The best training any parent can give a child is to train the child to train himself.

A. P. Gouthey

To endure is the first thing that a child ought to learn, and that which he will have the most need to know.

Jean Jacques Rousseau

The worst fault of the working classes is telling their children they're not going to succeed, saying: ''There is life, but it's not for you.''

John Mortimer

One must marvel at the intellectual quality of a teacher who can't understand why children assault one another in the hallway, playground, and city street, when in the classroom the highest accolades are reserved for those who have beaten their peers. In many subtle and some not so subtle ways, teachers demonstrate that what children learn means much less than that they triumph over their classmates. Is this not assault? Classroom defeat is only the pebble that creates widening ripples of hostility. It is self-perpetuating. It is reinforced by peer censure, parental disapproval, and loss of self-concept. If the classroom is a model, and if that classroom models competition, assault in the hallways should surprise no one.

Joseph Wax (adapted)

Children are living jewels dropped unsustained from heaven.

Robert Pollok

 

Spread the Word

Please help increase the popularity of this page by spreading this URL:

Pages in this Section

Back to Top

 

Disclaimer

Related Pages

Related Books

Max: A Co-Operative Board Game for Kids

Cooperative Board Games

Fairness (Richard Lavoie)

. . . as I speak to parents and teachers all over this country, I see classrooms and families being run based on the adults' concept of honesty, the adults' concept of truth, the adults' concept of liberty, patriotism, religion. And yet those same families and classrooms are being run based on the child's concept of fairness.

 

What I'd like you to do when this session is over tonight, is go home and walk into your attic, pull down your old philosophy books from high school or college, or even take out a Webster's dictionary, and look up the definition of "fairness." Fairness does not mean that everyone gets the same, fairness actually means that everyone gets what he or she needs.

 

And yet still, I'll deal with teachers where I'll say to a teacher, "Jody's going to be in your class next semester, teacher, and she's a wonderful, very bright kid. She's going to do very well in your math class, but she's got a learning disability and it's called a 'far-point copying problem,' and she can't copy off the blackboard. So here's what I'd like you to do: when you put problems on the blackboard for everyone to copy, I'd like you to write up an extra set for Jody and give that to Jody. And if that doesn't work, you don't have time for that, Lee's pretty quick, maybe Lee could write up two sets and then hand one across to Jody or even put a piece of carbon paper under Lee's sheet, so when she writes up one set of problems, there's an extra one automatically to give to Jody. I'd like you to do that please."

 

Invariably the teacher will say, "I can't do that." And I say, "why not?" There's a lot of answers I'll accept. I'll accept "because I don't know how." I'll accept "because I don't have time." I'll accept "because I don't believe in mainstreaming." I'll accept "because I don't like Jody." I will go to the mat with a teacher and I will discuss any one of those answers with a teacher. The one answer I will not discuss, the one answer that I think is beneath contempt and beneath discussing is the answer I hear most often, and that is: "I can't do that for Jody because it's not fair to the others." It's got nothing to do with the others! Jody needs it, the others don't. It has nothing to do with the others.

 

Let's take it and try it in an adult situation. Suppose I'm up here lecturing. In the middle of my lecture, god forbid in the middle of my lecture, Carolyn here falls off her chair. I look down at her and she's turning blue; cardiac arrest. God forbid, she's having a heart attack right in front of us, and I'm trained in C.P.R. technique, so I know what to do. How ludicrous, how unfair, how absolutely foolish and unethical would it be for me to say, "hey Carolyn, I'd like to help you, I really would, but heck we've got 30 people here. I haven't got time to give C.P.R. to everybody, and it wouldn't be fair to only give it to you." But the teacher who says, "I can't help the L.D. Child because it's not fair to the others" is working at the same moral level as a ten-year-old child.

 

And it's particularly important for you as parents to understand, because I know a lot of parents of special needs kids who spend full-time beating themselves up and trying to keep the scales balanced: "What do I do? Johnny, the L.D. Child, needs a special tutor. How do I make that up to the other kids, so that I'm fair to everybody?" You don't have to. As long as you can look into the eyes of the siblings and say, "honey, if it was you, I'd be doing the same thing."

 

Fairness does not mean that everyone gets the same. Fairness means that everyone gets what he or she needs. And we're not going to be able to work successfully with the child, mainstream child, learning disabled child, in the mainstream classroom until teachers and parents begin to understand that in order to be fair we've got to treat them differently.

 

Playdates and the LD Child (Richard Lavoie)

YouTube Videos

Related Links