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Atari 2600 Game History: 1982

Atari 2600 Game History: 1983

Release Date Quick List

January

Super Breakout (Atari)

Spacechase (Apollo) BG

Space Jockey (U.S. Games) BG

 

February

Haunted House (Atari)

 

March

Pac-Man (Atari) [official release]

Barnstorming (Activision)

Grand Prix (Activision)

Demon Attack (Imagic) BG

Star Voyager (Imagic) BG

Trick Shot (Imagic) BG

 

April

Pac-Man (Atari) [small towns & rural]

 

May

Yars' Revenge (Atari)

Defender (Atari)

 

June

Defender (Atari) [official release]

Chopper Command (Activision)

Starmaster (Activision)

S.W.: The Empire Strikes Back (P.B.) BG

 

July

Frogger (Parker Brothers) BG

Math Gran Prix (Atari)

Demons to Diamonds (Atari)

 

August

Berzerk (Atari)

Towering Inferno (U.S. Games) BG

 

September

Pitfall (Activision)

Star Raiders (Atari)

The Challenge of Nexar (Spectravision) BG

Tapeworm (Spectravision) BG

 

October

Megamania (Activision)

Swordquest Earthworld (Atari)

Realsports Baseball (Atari)

Realsports Volleyball (Atari)

Airlock (Data Age) BG

Bugs (Data Age) BG

Encounter at L-5 (Data Age) BG

Sssnake (Data Age) BG

Warplock (Data Age) BG

Karate (Ultravision) BG

Condor Attack (Ultravision) BG

Bachelor Party (Mystique) BG

Beat 'Em & Eat 'Em (Mystique) BG

Custer's Revenge (Mystique) BG

 

November

Raiders of the Lost Ark (Atari)

Spider-Man BG

Amidar BG

Sky Jinks

 

December

River Raid (Activision)

Realsports Football (Atari)

E.T. The Extra-Terrestrial (Atari)

Vanguard (Atari)

Rescue Terra I (VentureVision) BG

Alien (20th Century Fox) BG

Mega Force (20th Century Fox) BG

Fantastic Voyage (20th Century Fox) BG

Index

Related Links

Atari 1982 in Review

Release dates listed in Atari Age magazine.

 

Atari Owners Club Bulletin / VCS Owners Club Bulletin

Find release dates for Atari 2600 games that were sold in the UK.

 

I. C. When

A chronological history of computers, video games, and related technologies (at archive.org).

Me in the Atari years

Me (Duane Alan Hahn) in the Atari 2600 years.

Atari 2600 Video Game Release Dates for 1982
With pop culture atmosphere.

Information compiled by Duane Alan Hahn.

 

Below is an incomplete list of Atari 2600 video game release dates by month in the USA for the year 1982 along with lists of popular movies, TV shows, Top 40 music, and so on to help summon your treasured memories of the Atari 2600 and the early 1980s with the bonus of recreating the magical feelings of that special time. If you were too young or not even born yet, this page might be able to help you get the feeling of what it was like back then.

 

 

Link Colors

Links that jump to other places on this page are blue. Links that lead to other pages online are red.

 

 

Quick List and Index

For those who only want release dates and nothing else, there is a Release Date Quick List on the right side of this page. Below the quick list is an Index.

 

 

Copyright Date

Remember, the date on the box, cartridge, manual, and copyright screen can be different from the actual release date. For example, Atari 2600 Pac-Man was released in March/April of 1982, but the date on the box, cart, manual, and copyright screen say 1981.

 

 

YouTube

To help make your experience even more enjoyable, most items have a link next to them that will lead you to related search results at YouTube where you might find video game commercials, gameplay footage, music videos, and clips from TV shows or movies.

 

 

You Can Help

If you find a mistake, or have more information to add, such as month/year release dates for games, please contact me. Every little bit of credible information helps, no matter how insignificant you think it might be. Thanks for your help.

 

 

 

 

 

January 1982

 

January 1982

Super Breakout (Atari)

January release (according to '82 In Review from V1n4).

YouTube   Atarimania   AtariAge   Catalog   '82 In Review

 

January 1982

Spacechase (Apollo)

Best guess (using info from Videogaming Illustrated).

YouTube   Atarimania   AtariAge   Catalog

Filing Date: Jan. 18, 1982   Videogaming Illustrated

January 1982

 

Space Jockey (U.S. Games)

Best guess (using info from Video Games Magazine).

YouTube   Atarimania   AtariAge   Video Games Magazine

January 1982

On the Radio

"I Can't Go For That" by Hall and Oates   YouTube   ARC Weekly Top 40

"Pac-Man Fever" by Buckner & Garcia   YouTube   ARC Weekly Top 40

"Working For The Weekend" by Loverboy   YouTube   ARC Weekly Top 40

"That Girl" by Stevie Wonder   YouTube   ARC Weekly Top 40

January 1982

New on TV

Fame (January 7)   YouTube

Back to Top

 

 

 

 

February 1982

 

February 1982

Haunted House (Atari)

February release (according to THE RED-HOT NEW CARTRIDGES FOR 1982, and '82 In Review from V1n4).

YouTube   Atarimania   AtariAge   Catalog   THE RED-HOT NEW CARTRIDGES FOR 1982   '82 In Review

February 1982

On the Radio

"I Love Rock 'N Roll" by Joan Jett and the Blackhearts   YouTube   ARC Weekly Top 40

"Tonight I'm Yours" by Rod Stewart   YouTube   ARC Weekly Top 40

"We Got The Beat" by The Go-Go's   YouTube   ARC Weekly Top 40

"Do You Believe In Love" by Huey Lewis and The News   YouTube   ARC Weekly Top 40

"Take Off" by Bob & Doug McKenzie (Rick Moranis amd Dave Thomas)   YouTube   ARC Weekly Top 40

"Make A Move On Me" by Olivia Newton-John   YouTube   ARC Weekly Top 40

"Mirror, Mirror" by Diana Ross   YouTube   ARC Weekly Top 40

Back to Top

 

 

 

 

March 1982

 

March 1982

Pac-Man (Atari)

The official release date was March of 1982, but our local Woolco in Roanoke, Virginia didn't get it until April. See April for more information. And THE RED HOT NEW CARTRIDGES FOR 1982 release schedule actually says "available March/April."

YouTube   Atarimania   AtariAge   Catalog   '82 In Review

 

March 1982

Barnstorming (Activision)

March release (according to Activisions newsletter and catalog).

YouTube   Atarimania   AtariAge   Catalog   Activisions   Steve Cartwright Profile

 

March 1982

Grand Prix (Activision)

March release (according to Activisions newsletter and catalog).

YouTube   Atarimania   AtariAge   Catalog   Activisions   Videogaming Illustrated

 

March 1982

Demon Attack (Imagic)

Best guess (using info from Videogaming Illustrated).

YouTube   Atarimania   AtariAge   Catalog   Numb Thumb News: Rob Fulop

Filing Date: March 10, 1982   Videogaming Illustrated

 

March 1982

Star Voyager (Imagic)

Best guess (using info from Videogaming Illustrated).

YouTube   Atarimania   AtariAge   Catalog   Numb Thumb News: Expert Tips  

Filing Date: March 10, 1982   Videogaming Illustrated

 

March 1982

Trick Shot (Imagic)

Best guess (using info from Videogaming Illustrated).

YouTube   Atarimania   AtariAge   Catalog   Videogaming Illustrated

March 1982

On the Radio

"Freeze-Frame" by The J. Geils Band   YouTube   ARC Weekly Top 40

"Juke Box Hero" by Foreigner   YouTube   ARC Weekly Top 40

"867-5309/Jenny" by Tommy Tutone   YouTube   ARC Weekly Top 40

"(Oh) Pretty Woman" by Van Halen   YouTube   ARC Weekly Top 40

March 1982

New at the Movies

Porky's (March 19)   YouTube

March 1982

New on TV

T.J. Hooker (March 13)   YouTube

Cagney & Lacey (March 25)   YouTube

9 To 5 (March 25)   YouTube

March 1982

History

     

    Text below from Videogaming Illustrated (December 1983, page 25)

     

    In March 1982, Imagic released its first three games, Trick Shot, Star Voyager, and Demon Attack. Demon Attack quickly shot to the top of the bestseller lists and stayed there. Demon Attack money helped Imagic adapt to the changing market . . . for a while.

     

     

     

     

    Text below from Videogaming Illustrated (August 1982, page 15)

     

    Q: Have there been ideas which Activision has found impossible to conquer, even with its obvious pool of talent?

     

    A: That always happens. But what appears, initially, to be difficult to make work. eventually comes around and does work. Grand Prix, which we released in March, was developed over a year ago. But David (Crane) put it on the shelf and came back to it. You can't say of any particular concept that we have not completed and released that it may not come back around, a solution found to whatever problems plague it during the design.

Back to Top

 

 

 

 

April 1982

April 1982

Pac-Man (Atari)

Although the date on the box, cart, manual, and copyright screen say 1981, Atari 2600 Pac-Man wasn't released until March/April of 1982.

The main reason my family bought an Atari 2600 was for Pac-Man and we brought that first Atari 2600 home on March 27, 1982. We had pre-ordered Pac-Man and got it as soon as it hit the store (Woolco in Tanglewood Mall Roanoke, Virginia). The official release date was March, and although other people in the country could buy it in March, it didn't get to our store until April, so that's why it is listed here under April. I was stuck playing Combat for at least a week until Pac-Man arrived at the store.

YouTube   Atarimania   AtariAge   Catalog   '82 In Review

April 1982

On the Radio

"Did It In A Minute" by Hall & Oats   YouTube   ARC Weekly Top 40

"Get Down On It" by Kool & The Gang   YouTube   ARC Weekly Top 40

"Empty Garden" by Elton John   YouTube   ARC Weekly Top 40

"Don't You Want Me" by The Human League   YouTube   ARC Weekly Top 40

"Ebony And Ivory" by Paul McCartney with Stevie Wonder   YouTube   ARC Weekly Top 40

April 1982

New at the Movies

Diner (April 2)   YouTube

Cat People (April 2)   YouTube

The Sword and the Sorcerer (April 23)   YouTube

Back to Top

 

 

 

 

May 1982

 

May 1982

Yars' Revenge (Atari)

I got to buy this game when it was new in May with money I earned. I was supposed to move some bushes for an old lady (my former step-father's mother). I caught a ride to Woolco, which was only a few miles away from her house, so I decided to walk. I thought I could find a shortcut through some woods, but instead, it took many hours to get there because I kept hitting roadblocks of all kinds: fences, trenches (full of bushes and trees) that were too deep and wide to cross, vicious dogs, and so on. I'm don't remember how I finally got there, but I did get there. I transplanted the bushes, got paid around $30 and her husband drove me to a department store so I could buy Yars' Revenge for $24.97.

YouTube   Atarimania   AtariAge   Catalog   '82 In Review

 

May 1982

Defender (Atari)

Unlike Pac-Man, Defender was early, at least where I lived. Everything says Defender was supposed to come out in June. I even got a card in the mail from Atari Age magazine telling me that Defender was coming in June and that I should order it now, but I was glad I didn't because Woolco had it in time for my girlfriend's birthday (May 17). She loved Defender, but didn't have an Atari, so I was very happy that I got Defender early so she could play it on her birthday at my house.

YouTube   Atarimania   AtariAge   Catalog   AAM V1N1 p.6 (EPROM Report)   '82 In Review

May 1982

On the Radio

"Rosanna" by Toto   YouTube   ARC Weekly Top 40

"Let It Whip" by Dazz Band   YouTube   ARC Weekly Top 40

"Tainted Love" by Soft Cell   YouTube   ARC Weekly Top 40

"Hurts So Good" by John Cougar Mellencamp   YouTube   ARC Weekly Top 40

"Love's Been A Little Bit Hard On Me" by Juice Newton   YouTube   ARC Weekly Top 40

"Only The Lonely" by The Motels   YouTube   ARC Weekly Top 40

May 1982

New at the Movies

Conan the Barbarian (May 14)   YouTube

Annie (May 21)   YouTube

Dead Men Don't Wear Plaid (May 21)   YouTube

Mad Max 2: The Road Warrior (May 21)   YouTube

Rocky 3 (May 28)   YouTube

Back to Top

 

 

 

 

June 1982

June 1982

Defender (Atari)

The official release date was June of 1982, but our local Woolco in Roanoke, Virginia got it a month earlier. See May for more information.

YouTube   Atarimania   AtariAge   Catalog

AAM V1N1 p.6 (EPROM Report)   AAM V2N2 p.16   AAM V2N2 p.17   '82 In Review

 

June 1982

Chopper Command (Activision)

June release (according to Activisions newsletter and catalog).

YouTube   Atarimania   AtariAge   Catalog   Activisions

 

June 1982

Starmaster (Activision)

June release (according to Activisions newsletter and catalog).

YouTube   Atarimania   AtariAge   Catalog   Activisions

 

June 1982 (maybe August)

Star Wars: The Empire Strikes Back (Parker Brothers)

Best guess (using info from Billboard, Videogaming Illustrated, and Video Games Player).

YouTube   Atarimania   AtariAge   Catalog

Billboard   Videogaming Illustrated   Video Games Player

June 1982

On the Radio

"Do I Do" by Stevie Wonder   YouTube   ARC Weekly Top 40

"Eye Of The Tiger" by Survivor   YouTube   ARC Weekly Top 40

"Abracadabra" by Steve Miller Band   YouTube   ARC Weekly Top 40

"Hold Me" by Fleetwood Mac   YouTube   ARC Weekly Top 40

"Hard To Say I'm Sorry" by Chicago   YouTube   ARC Weekly Top 40

"Even the Nights Are Better" by Air Supply   YouTube   ARC Weekly Top 40

June 1982

New at the Movies

Poltergeist (June 4)   YouTube

Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan (June 4)   YouTube

ET: The Extra-Terrestrial (June 11)   YouTube

Firefox (June 18)   YouTube

Blade Runner (June 25)   YouTube

The Thing (June 25)   YouTube

June 1982

History

    Text below from Billboard (November 6, 1982, page 58)

     

    [TRIVIA: JOURNEY ESCAPE CARTRIDGE CONCEPT BORN IN JUNE OF 1982]

    Rice said that because the Journey cartridge concept was born in June, it precluded an earlier release for the pre-Christmas season. However, Rice added, the cartridge would be timely as a result of Atari hardware sales during Christmas. He said surveys indicate that new Atari buyers purchase at least three cartridges during the first two months of ownership.

     

    Rice noted that Data Age will eventually produce the Journey game for both the Coleco and Intellivision systems and is currently negotiating arcade rights. An arcade deal would mark the first time a home game was adapted for arcades instead of the other way around.

     

     

     

     

    Text below from Billboard (December 11, 1982, page 8)

     

    PARKER BROTHERS RELEASING 16 NEW GAME CARTRIDGES

    Parker Brothers, the General Mills toy and game manufacturer which successfully launched a video game line in June, plans the release of 16 new cartridges in 1983.

    . . . .

    Parker's introductory cartridges were "Frogger" and "The Empire Strikes Back," which the company says have had a combined sales in excess of three million units. A November release consisted of "Amidar" and "Spider-Man."

     

     

     

     

    Text below from Videogaming Illustrated (February 1983, page 10)

     

    Parker Brothers certainly has had a phenomenal start with The Empire Strikes Back videogame: released in June, it has achieved over thirty million dollars in retail sales. That makes it one of the top grossing home videogames in history.

Back to Top

 

 

 

 

July 1982

 

July 1982 (maybe August)

Frogger (Parker Brothers)

Best guess (using info from Billboard, Videogaming Illustrated, and Video Games Player).

YouTube   Atarimania   AtariAge   Catalog

Billboard   Videogaming Illustrated   Video Games Player

 

July 1982

Math Gran Prix (Atari)

July release (according to Atari Age order form and page 4 of V1n2).

YouTube   Atarimania   AtariAge   Catalog   AAM V1N2 p.6   '82 In Review

 

July 1982

Demons to Diamonds (Atari)

July release (according to Atari Age order form and page 4 of V1n2).

YouTube   Atarimania   AtariAge   Catalog   AAM V1N2 p.6   '82 In Review

July 1982

On the Radio

"Your Imagination" by Hall & Oats   YouTube   ARC Weekly Top 40

"Eye In The Sky" by Alan Parsons Project   YouTube   ARC Weekly Top 40

"Take It Away" by Paul McCartney   YouTube   ARC Weekly Top 40

"Vacation" by Go-Go's   YouTube   ARC Weekly Top 40

"I Found Somebody" by Glenn Frey   YouTube   ARC Weekly Top 40

"Love Is In Control (Finger On The Trigger)" by Donna Summer   YouTube   ARC Top 40

"You Should Hear How She Talks About You" by Melissa Manchester   YouTube   ARC Top 40

"Love Will Turn You Around" by Kenny Rogers   YouTube   ARC Weekly Top 40

"Blue Eyes" by Elton John   YouTube   ARC Weekly Top 40

July 1982

New at the Movies

The Secret of Nimh (July 2)   YouTube

Tron (July 9)   YouTube

Six Pack (July 16)   YouTube

Zapped (July 23)   YouTube

The World According to Garp (July 23)   YouTube

Best Little Whorehouse in Texas (July 23)   YouTube

An Officer and a Gentleman (July 28)   YouTube

Night Shift (July 30)   YouTube

July 1982

History

     

    Text below from Billboard (July 3, 1982, page 10)

     

    In July, the Beverly, Mass. manufacturer will introduce "Frogger," a home version of an arcade favorite, licensed from Sega Enterprises.

     

     

     

     

    Text below from Videogaming Illustrated (August 1982, page 10)

     

    One month after the release of Star Wars: The Empire Strikes Back, Parker Brothers will ship Frogger, a Freeway-like challenge based on the Sega arcade game.

Back to Top

 

 

 

 

August 1982

 

August 1982

Berzerk (Atari)

August release (according to Atari Age order form and page 11 of V1n2).

YouTube   Atarimania   AtariAge   catalog

AAM V1N2 p.11   AAM V2N4 p.15   '82 In Review   Arcade Express

 

August 1982

Towering Inferno (U.S. Games)

Best guess (using info from Arcade Express and Video Games Player).

Trivia: Original instructions completed by Paul Allen Newell on May 28, 1982.

YouTube   Atarimania   AtariAge

Filing Date: Sept. 17, 1982   Arcade Express   Video Games Player

August 1982

On the Radio

"Someday, Someway" by Marshall Crenshaw   YouTube   ARC Weekly Top 40

"Only Time Will Tell" by Asia   YouTube   ARC Weekly Top 40

"Jack & Diane" by John Cougar Mellencamp   YouTube   ARC Weekly Top 40

"Words" by Missing Persons   YouTube   ARC Weekly Top 40

"Who Can It Be Now?" by Men At Work   YouTube   ARC Weekly Top 40

August 1982

New at the Movies

Pink Floyd: The Wall (August 6)   YouTube

Fast Times at Ridgemont High (August 13)   YouTube

Friday the 13th, Part 3 (August 13)   YouTube

August 1982

New on TV

Filthy Rich (August 9)   YouTube

August 1982

McDonald's/Atari Contest

"Taste the Thrill of Atari at McDonald's" promotion starts on 8/15/1982.

YouTube   AAM V1N2 p.8   Atari History Museum

August 1982

History

    Text below from Arcade Express (August 15, 1982)

     

     

    NEW ATARI GAMES FOR VCS

    "Berserk" will be published by Atari in August and should be in the stores before the end of the month. This is the home version of the popular coin-op from Stern Electronics that has been wowing the arcaders for the past two years. Just as "Berserk" comes to the VCS, a super deluxe version of this maze shootout called " Frenzy" is going into the arcades.

     

    "Star Raiders" premiere date is September. It will be packaged with a new controller (much in the same way that "Indy 500" was marketed), and is priced at $39.95. The new controller is a keypad type with a disk. Company sources characterize "Star Raiders" as a mindblower, with outstanding visuals and hot play action.

     

     

    SUPERCHARGER FOR THE VCS

    A Supercharger for the Atari VCS is being marketed by Arcadia. This RAM cart plugs into the game slot to increase the graphic resolution capabilities of the VCS, making it possible to move more objects around on the screen simultaneously.

     

    The Supercharger connects to an ordinary tape recorder, and games will be marketed on cassette for about $1.5 each. Among the releases is a wacky invasion game called "Communist Mutants From Outer Space", and a space pilot game that's said to outdo "Star Raiders".

     

    The Supercharger retails for around $70, and comes packaged with one game.

     

     

    TIGER PLANS VCS CARTRIDGES

    Tiger Electronic Toys is one of the newest entrants into the video cartridge sweepstakes! Tiger has formed a videogame cartridge division called Tigervision, for development and marketing of cartridges for the Atari VCS.

     

    Long on the fringes of the electronic game business, Tiger plans to emphasize arcade-style action coupled with superior graphics. "Jawbreaker" has chomping sets of teeth eating candy dots in this maze-chase game. "King Kong" requires the gamer to rescue Faye Wray from Kong by climbing to the top of the Empire State Building, while leaping the bombs Kong throws. In "River Patrol", the gamer steers a leaky boat up the Congo, saving refugees and avoiding obstacles. "Threshold" is a vertical scrolling shootout in space, and "Marauder" requires you to maneuver through mazes while killing or avoiding the robot guards.

     

    Randy Rissman, President of Tiger, says, "Tigervision's cartridges will aim to be among the best in graphic quality and play value."

     

     

    INTELLIVISION MEETS ATARI

    Mattel Electronics has developed a new line of videogame cartridges for the Atari VCS. Mattel claims the new games, named the M Network, are designed to fully utilize the capabilities of the VCS. The M Network games use the themes of Intellivision cartridges, both currently popular games and carts that are soon to be released.

     

    The first M Network cartridges entered distribution in mid-July. Some of the titles to be released in 1982 include "Astroblast", "Space Attack", "Super Challenge Baseball", "Super Challenge Football", and "International Soccer". The company plans 11 M Network games in 1982.

     

    Mattel promises appealing game themes and advanced programming techniques for the new videogarne series. Joshua Denham, President of Mattel Electronics, says, "M Network offers owners of Atari VCS units access to markedly improved graphics, gameplay, and extended enjoyment."

     

     

    FILM MAKER PLANS FOXY GAMES

    Twentieth Century Fox Film Corporation has formed Fox Video Games, Inc., to develop and market a line of cartridges for use with the Atari VCS. Four new games will be marketed in the Fall.

     

    Sirius Software designed four new games for Fox. In "Deadly Duck", programmed by Ed Hodapp, crabs bomb a duck with bricks, and the duck must shoot back with a gun. "Beany Bopper", programmed by Grady Ward, has a stun-fire laser for the gamer to shoot at propeller beany-creatures. In "Worm War I", programmed by David Lubar, gigantic worms terrorize a city. The gamer fights back using a tank. "Fast Eddie", by Mark Turmell, challenges arcaders to gather treasure by climbing up and down ladders to different levels, while evading Sneakers trying to run him down and stomp on him.

     

     

     

     

    Text below from Arcade Express (August 30, 1982)

     

    VIDTEC NAME PHASE-OUT PLANNED

    The brand name "Vidtec," seen on the scrolling shoot-out "Space Jockey," will soon be relegated to no more than a minor role, if that. The company, which operates as part: of the Fisher-Price division of Quaker Oats, will henceforth emphasize the name "U.S. Games." The next cartridge from the company will be "Towering Inferno," a firefighting action game in which the player must race through a burning skyscraper to save residents and douse flames.

     

     

     

     

    Text below from Videogaming Illustrated (August 1982, page 7 and 8)

     

    APOLLO, LIKE ITS NAMESAKE, SHOOTS FOR THE VIDEOGAMING STARS!

    Despite the downbeat reviews Apollo garnered for Skeet Shoot, its first videogame, no one's going to nap through four cartridges the company recently put on the market. Indeed, like Shakespeare, author of the world's best literature, and who, by the way, was castigated as an "upstart crow" after his own first work was performedApollo intends to create classics. Lively, unique, fraught with color and exotica, the newest of the Atari-compatible games suggest that the Texas-based manufacturer is well on its way.

     

    Apollo is a subsidiary of National Career Consultants, a company founded by entrepreneur Patrick Roper. For eleven years NCC has successfully produced and distributed educational and career guidance films to high schools and colleges. Unfortunately, government belt-tightening has limited the funds available to many of NCC's customers and, early last year, NCC had no choice but to cut back on their film operation and branch into other fields. Initially. the firm considered distributing dramatic works on videocassette, but discovered that the major studios and producers of popular entertainment were already committed to other manufacturers. As for creating their own feature-length motion pictures, the high cost of such an undertaking was prohibitive. However, NCC was not unaware of the booming videogame industry; the decision to diversity in that direction was reached in October of 1981, after market research and the obvious growth of the field indicated that there was room for a newcomer.

     

    Roper decided to concentrate solely on software, adding a computer programmer to the existing staff of NCC and rushing the company's first game to the market by December of last year. "All in all, Skeet Shoot wasn't a spectacular game to start off with," concedes Emmitt Crawford, Apollo's director of public relations. He acknowledges that the graphics were flat, little more than a bor flinging pellets at a small saucer. To make matters worse, a high percentage of the cartridges had to be recalled due to image roll. But Skeet Shoot managed to cash in on the lucrative Christmas buying season and, more important, made dealers and consumers alike aware of the new company.

     

    One month after the inauspicious debut of Skeet Shoot, the company released the better-conceived, more topical Spacechase. This time, both the graphics and subject were worth writing home about. As commander of three Mark 16 starcruisers, the player is required to beat back alien raiders who, materializing from hyperspace, mercilessly fire neutron missiles and heat-seeking proton missiles as they attack from all sides. With its scrolling planet surface and fast-paced action, Spacechase was an immediate hit. Crawford says it's presently back-ordered to the tune of nearly 200,000 cartridges "and," he marvels, "even Skeet Shoot is still hanging in there," with several thousand orders waiting to be filled as Apollo's production schedule allows.

     

    Today, Apollo has a staff of five programmers plus thirty production people to handle cartridge assembly. To ensure continued prosperity, Apollo has endowed the four new games with an individualistic blend of mystery, fantasy, and even humor, traits which are helping them to secure a following in the marketplace. They plan to release a new game every four to six weeks.

     

    Space Cavern is the trendiest of the games, the saga of an astronaut on a mission to a mysterious planet in a remote quadrant of the galaxy. The pioneer's assignment is to chart a maze-like cave inhabited by a monstrous hydra whose tentacles generate twenty million electron volts. Iridescent eyes appear throughout the game, but the player can never tell until seconds before contact which pair of eyes will materialize into the deadly monster. The space explorer is armed with a pistol which can shoot horizontally and vertically. affording full protection from two aerial nasties and one ground-based creature. A particularly impressive touch is the way the astronaut's skeleton lights up whenever the monster strikes, after which the explorer demolecularizes, ending the game as a pile of dust.

     

    Lochjaw is a slightly more out-of-the-ordinary game, as players send their divers to a Spanish galleon which lies at the bottom of a seabed. As the waters ripple around them, colors trickling through, the divers must enter a yawning hole in the ship and recover a fortune in diamonds, one gem at a time. This is accomplished by navigating through a mazethe one tired motif in this excellent gamewhere in due course the diver is assaulted by a pair of sharks as well as a saurian relative of the beast from Loch Ness. The sharks travel at random, one considerably faster than the other, while the sea serpent has the capacity to home in on and pursue the diver. To thwart the animals, the diver can have at them with a shark gun or crawl into a shark cage. There is also a cave which acts like a dimensional warp, enabling divers to escape any predator. However, like the hyperspace mode in Asteroids or Astrosmash, there is no way of knowing exactly where the cave will hurl you. Chances are good that it will bear you from one danger quite literally into the jaws of another.

     

    Unquestionably the most charming of Apollo's new games is Lost Luggage. It would not be inaccurate to dub this the first "comedy cartridge": the player is at an airport as the suitcases arrive via conveyor belt. Suddenly, the luggage flies from the carousel and the player must catch it. Miss the suitcase and it opens, spilling all manner of personal effects over the ground.

     

    Last of the current Apollo releases is Racquetball, a faithful recreation of the indoor sport seen from the players' point of view rather than the sidelines.

     

    Apollo maintains that these games barely hint at the novel cartridges and accoutrements soon to appear. Roper informed this magazine that six additional cartridges will be released by December. "No licenses," he reports. "all our own ideas," and Apollo has already made available the first personalized cartridge. For $99.95, you can have Space Chase programmed so that your initials will flash on the screen when the mother ship is destroyed. It's ideal for businesses, which Crawford indicates have been their biggest client. using the electronically embossed games as premiums. Apollo also expects to release software for Intellivision consoles by mid-1983, and may yet enter the videocassette field using the medium for educational purposes. "We've even briefly considered using videocassettes to offer strategies for our games," Crawford notes. Preparing games for computers is another of Apollos short-range objectives, though they have no plans to enter the arcade field.

     

    The people at Apollo realize they've got to burn the midnight oil if they're going to compete with the giants like Atari and Coleco. Crawford admits the battle will be a rough one, but feels up to the challenge. "We're in good shape because we got in ahead of a number of companies. Even though they're conglomerates and pretty stiff competition creatively, we think there's ample room for everybody. Besides," he observes, "what you need in this business is more than a big budget. You have to have games that people want, and we think we've got just that."

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September 1982

 

David Crane talks about programming PitFall!

 

September 1982

Pitfall! (Activision)

September release (according to Activisions newsletter and catalog).

Trivia: The 'laser' from Laser Blast was used to create the vine in Pitfall.

YouTube   Atarimania   AtariAge   catalog   Activisions   Designer's Corner

 

September 1982

Star Raiders (Atari)

September release (according to Atari Age order form and page 9 of V1n3).

YouTube   Atarimania   AtariAge   catalog

AAM V1N3 p.9   AAM V2N2 p.30   '82 In Review   Arcade Express

 

September 1982

The Challenge of Nexar (Spectravision)

Best guess (using info from Arcade Express).

YouTube   Atarimania   AtariAge   catalog   Arcade Express

 

September 1982

Tapeworm (Spectravision)

Best guess (using info from Arcade Express).

YouTube   Atarimania   AtariAge   catalog   Arcade Express

September 1982

On the Radio

"Valley Girl" by Frank Zappa/Moon Unit Zappa   YouTube   ARC Weekly Top 40

"I Ran (So Far Away) ~ A Flock Of Seagulls   YouTube   ARC Weekly Top 40

"Gloria" by Laura Branigan   YouTube   ARC Weekly Top 40

"Heart Attack" by Olivia Newton-John   YouTube   ARC Weekly Top 40

"Don't Fight It" by Kenny Loggins/Steve Perry   YouTube   ARC Weekly Top 40

September 1982

New at the Movies

Eating Raoul (September 24)   YouTube

Amityville II: The Possession (Sept. 24)   YouTube

September 1982

New on TV

The Powers Of Matthew Star (September 17)   YouTube

Tales Of The Gold Monkey (September 22)   YouTube

Family Ties (September 22)   YouTube

Bring 'Em Back Alive (September 24)   YouTube

Silver Spoons (September 25)   YouTube

Pac-Man Saturday Morning Cartoon (September 25)   YouTube

Knight Rider (September 26)   YouTube

Matt Houston (September 26)   YouTube

Square Pegs (September 27)   YouTube

Cheers (September 30)   YouTube

September 1982

History

    Text below from Arcade Express (September 12, 1982)

     

    PAC-MAN GOBBLES UP SATURDAY T.V.

    "Pac-Man", an animated television series, will air on September 25, on ABC's Saturday morning children's schedule. "Pac-Man" will also star in a prime time kiddy holiday special later this year.

     

    The series, long on cute but probably as sensible as most Saturday cartoons, features Pac-Man, Ms. Pac, and Pac-Baby. They live in Pac-land along with the family dog, Chomp Chomp, and Sour Puss, a sly cat. This utopia is threatened by Mezmaron, a meanie who wants all the power pellet trees in the forest. Mezmaron's assistants are the ghost monsters Inky, Blinky, Pinky and Clyde, along with a girl-ghost named Sue.

     

     

    COMPUTER BIZ BOOM

    Sales in the home computer industry in 1982 should total 1.25 to 1.5 million units, says the Wall Street Journal, predicting an eight-fold increase over the number sold in 1981.

     

     

    PARKER BROTHERS ROLLS NEW GAMES

    The "Monopoly Playmaster" enhances electronically America's favorite boardgame with lights, sounds and visual effects. The Playmaster is said to speed up the game by managing dice rolls, sales and repurchases of property, and bank loans.

     

    A two-week ad blitz started August 23 introduced the "Monopoly Playmaster" in New York and Chicago, with a series of 10-second spots highlighting the features of the unit.

     

     

    Meanwhile, "Frogger", Parker Bros.' latest cartridge for use with the Atari VCS, has hopped into the stores, and "Spiderman" will be swinging along sometime in November.

     

     

    "EMPIRE" BIG HIT

    Parker Brothers projects $30-million in retail sales of "The Empire Strikes Back" videogame cartridge in its first year. The cartridge, usable on the Atari VCS, will be followed next year by another Star Wars Saga game. The next George Lucas movie in the epic adventure, "Revenge of the Jedi", will be released in May of 1983. The next Parker Bros. game will coincide with the debut of the 20th Century Fox movie.

     

     

    VIDEOGAMES GO TO THE MOVIES

    Three videogame manufacturers benefited from record movie attendances during the 1982 summer season. Activision, Mattel and Atari all bought cinema commercial packages from Screenvision, which has 1600 theater affiliates nationwide.

     

    Activision started it, with ads for "Chopper Command" and "Star Master". Mattel ordered four weeks of two-minute "Tron" ads, run at theaters playing the Disney feature. Atari followed with ads for "Dig Dug", and will begin movie promotions of "Yars' Revenge" in October.

     

     

     

    Text below from Arcade Express (September 26, 1982)

     

    ARCADIA TO CHANGE NAME

    Arcadia is the company marketing the Supercharger for the Atari VCS, a RAM cart that increases the graphic resolution capabilities of the VCS, making possible games that move more objects on the screen simultaneously. And the Arcadia 2001 is a new videogame system from Emerson Radio Corp. Names too close for comfort, you think? Well, so did they, and Arcadia is going to have to come up with a new moniker. Seems that the Emerson Arcadia 2001 beat the Supercharger onto the retail shelves, and they have first dibs. No word yet on the new name, but watch this space.

     

     

     

    SPECTRAVISION ANNOUNCES NEW CARTRIDGES FOR VCS

    Spectravision doubled its line of game cartridges for the Atari VCS with the shipment in September of two more titles. "The Challenge of Nexar" is an arcade-style action game that Spectravision's President Josh Kalter says requires constant movement by the arcader. "You can't sit still in this game," says Kalter. "It's really different." The other addition to the line is "Tape Worm". The slithery creature crawls around the screen eating vegetarian prizes while avoiding spiders and birds.

     

     

    DATA AGE GIVES FREE RECORD

    In a unique marketing move, Data Age will provide distributors and retailers with free records to pass out to customers on Sept. 17, 1982. On that date, 3½ minute stereo discs will be given away by dealers to promote the Data Age product line. Data Age has 5 videogames: "Sssnake", "Warplock", "Airlock", "Bugs", and "Encounter at L-5". Elements of each game are contained in the record produced by Craig Hundley, creator of special electronic music for films such as "Star Trek: The Movie", "The Black Hole", "Firefox", and others. The disc, called "Mindscape", is said to "blend the imagery and action of Data Age's first five videogames"

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October 1982

 

October 1982

Megamania (Activision)

October release (according to Activisions newsletter).

YouTube   Atarimania   AtariAge   catalog   Activisions   Designer's Corner

 

October 1982

Swordquest: Earthworld (Atari)

October release (according to Atari Age order form and '82 In Review from V1n4).

YouTube   Atarimania   AtariAge   Catalog   AAM V1N3 p.11   '82 In Review

 

October 1982

Realsports Baseball (Atari)

October release (according to Atari Age order form and '82 In Review from V1n4).

YouTube   Atarimania   AtariAge   Catalog   AAM V1N3 p.6   '82 In Review

 

October 1982

Realsports Volleyball (Atari)

October release (according to Atari Age order form and '82 In Review from V1n4).

YouTube   Atarimania   AtariAge   Catalog   AAM V1N3 p.6   '82 In Review

 

October 1982

Airlock (Data Age)

Best guess (using info from Billboard and Videogaming Illustrated).

YouTube   Atarimania   AtariAge   Catalog   Billboard   Billboard   Videogaming Illustrated

 

October 1982

Bugs (Data Age)

Best guess (using info from Billboard and Videogaming Illustrated).

YouTube   Atarimania   AtariAge   Catalog   Billboard   Billboard   Videogaming Illustrated

 

October 1982

Encounter at L-5 (Data Age)

Best guess (using info from Billboard and Videogaming Illustrated).

Trivia: Encounter at L-5 was originally going to be called Magalon Invasion.

YouTube   Atarimania   AtariAge   Catalog   Billboard   Billboard   Videogaming Illustrated

 

October 1982

Sssnake (Data Age)

Best guess (using info from Billboard and Videogaming Illustrated).

YouTube   Atarimania   AtariAge   Catalog   Billboard   Billboard   Videogaming Illustrated

 

October 1982

Warplock (Data Age)

Best guess (using info from Billboard and Videogaming Illustrated).

YouTube   Atarimania   AtariAge   Catalog   Billboard   Billboard   Videogaming Illustrated

 

October 1982

Karate (Ultravision)

Best guess (using info from Arcade Express).

YouTube   Atarimania   AtariAge   Arcade Express

 

October 1982

Condor Attack (Ultravision)

Best guess (using info from Arcade Express).

YouTube   Atarimania   AtariAge   Arcade Express

 

October 1982

Bachelor Party (Mystique)

Best guess (using info from Arcade Express).

YouTube   Atarimania   AtariAge   Arcade Express

 

October 1982

Beat 'Em & Eat 'Em (Mystique)

Best guess (using info from Arcade Express).

YouTube   Atarimania   AtariAge   Arcade Express

 

October 1982

Custer's Revenge (Mystique)

Best guess (using info from Arcade Express).

YouTube   Atarimania   AtariAge   Arcade Express

October 1982

On the Radio

"Love Me Tomorrow" by Chicago   YouTube   ARC Weekly Top 40

"Nobody" by Sylvia   YouTube   ARC Weekly Top 40

"Mickey" by Toni Basil   YouTube   ARC Weekly Top 40

"Rock This Town" by Stray Cats   YouTube   ARC Weekly Top 40

"Steppin' Out" by Joe Jackson   YouTube   ARC Weekly Top 40

"Pressure" by Billy Joel   YouTube   ARC Weekly Top 40

"Muscles" by Diana Ross   YouTube   ARC Weekly Top 40

"I'm So Excited" by Pointer Sisters   YouTube   ARC Weekly Top 40

October 1982

New at the Movies

My Favorite Year (October 1)   YouTube

First Blood (October 22)   YouTube

Halloween 3 (October 22)   YouTube

Monsignor (October 22)   IMDb

October 1982

New on TV

Remington Steele (October 1)   YouTube

Voyagers (October 3)   YouTube

Tucker's Witch (October 6)   IMDb

Newhart (October 25)   YouTube

St. Elsewhere (October 26)   YouTube

October 1982

History

    Text below from Arcade Express (October 10, 1982)

     

     

    ULTRAVISION INTRODUCES 32K GAMES FOR ATARI VCS

    Ultravision enters the videogame software biz this month with two 32K VCS-compatible cartridges. "Karate" was designed by Joseph Amelio, a man who ought to know. Amelio has 25 years experience in martial arts, and holds a black belt. The expertise he has in that field is carried over into this unusual hand-to-hand combat. The referee starts the match, and two fighters courteously bow to each other. Players score points when their on-screen counterparts land kicks or punches to the opponent's head or stomach. Each match has five two-minute rounds. The on-screen fighters wear white robes and belts that go through color changes to indicate their achievements, from white to red, brown, purple, and finally to the coveted black belt. An unusual dimensional approach allows fighters to move around each other rather than being superimposed as they pass next to one another. "Karate" can be played solitaire or by two gamers.

     

    The second release this month is "Condor Attack", a very fast invasion game described as being for the champs. October brings a strategy action game, "Quest For the Idol", and "Spider Kong", a climbing game. Ultravision expects to market eight games by Christmas, all with superior 32K graphics and arcade-quality sound effects.

     

     

     

    HERE COME THE ADULT VIDEOGAMES

    "When you score, you score" is the slogan for the Mystique/Swedish Erotica games reaching the market in October. Some of the titles retailing for $49.95 are "Bachelor Party", "Beat 'Em & Eat 'Em" and "Custer's Revenge" (with a naked general running a desert obstacle course to ravage an Indian maiden). The relatively poor reproduction of body parts on TV screens is said to soften the sexual impact of the games, and the packaging has been subdued in order to make them more suitable for mass retailing. Backers of the venture expect X-rated games to be a huge category, just as live-action movies are a big part of the videocassette industry.

     

     

    SUPERCHARGER IS A HIT

    The Supercharger for the Atari VCS went on sale in 40 Broadway Department Stores in Southern California at the end of August, and the company describes early consumer reaction as "exceptional". The $70 Supercharger, which increases graphic resolution capabilities of the VCS, comes with one game, "Phaser Patrol". Three additional games, "Communist Mutants From Space", "Fireball", and "Suicide Mission" will be marketed this fall for $15 each.

     

    "Consumers came in, took a look, then came back and bought, reports Ken Hall, a spokesman for Arcadia. The Supercharger next goes on sale in Northern California, then Chicago, New York City, and Detroit. It should be in 10 major markets before Christmas.

     

    Meanwhile the company is still seeking a new name, since Arcadia was previously tagged by Emerson for the Arcadia 2001 videogame system. The new moniker should be chosen soon.

     

     

     

     

    Text below from Video Games Magazine (October 1982, page 16)

     

    U.S. Games/Vid Tech.

    The company was recently bought by Quaker Oats and. appropriately enough, its first cart challenges you to eat a bowl of cereal before it becomes soggy. (Just kidding.) Space Jockey has been out since January and six more games are expected by the year's end. So far we know that Word Zapper involves spelling in space; Sneak'n'Peak is video hide'n'seek for the pre-school crowd; and Towering Inferno features a burning building (bet you never would have guessed). Commander Raid and Missile Intercept are two of its other titles.

     

     

     

     

    Text below from Billboard (June 26, 1982, page 15)

     

    Data Age will bow five $31.95 list games Oct. 1. They are: "Encounter at L-5," "Warplock," SSSnake," "Airlock" and "Survival Run."

    . . . .

     

    Approximately Sept. 1, Woodman [Telesys] expects to deliver three home video games. Listing for $31.95, they will include: "Fast Food," "Coco Nuts" and "Space Maze."

     

     

     

     

    Text below from Billboard (November 6, 1982, page 3)

     

    The Campbell, Calif.-based company [Data Age] introduced its first five game cartridges Oct. 1.

     

     

     

     

    Text below from Videogaming Illustrated (February 1983, page 7)

     

    DATA AGE

    This new company began distributing its Atari-compatible videogames in October. The first five releases were:

     

    SSSnake, in which you must overcome pterodaetyls, trachodons, and other dinosaurs in order to reach an ancient fortress. There, deadly snakes try to invade your hiding place, snakes which you must cut down to size.

     

    Encounter at L-5, not the game we suggested in last issue's You Read It Here First, but a battle between space colonists and invaders from the Megalon Solar System. (Never mind that Data Age places the human colony beyond the orbit of the moon, when L-5 is a point between the earth and the moon. It's easy to become disoriented in space.)

     

    Bugs, a struggle between astronauts exploring subterranean hives on an alien world and the creeping monsters which dwell thereinincluding the defense-penetrating Super-Drones.

     

    Warplock, more star wars, this time between your space Cruiser and intergalactic pirates.

     

    Airlock, a clever variation of the multi-level game popularized by Donkey Kong, as the captain of a disabled submarine must retrieve keys to free the crew before the craft takes on too much water; all the while, the officer must dodge torpedoes which have come loose from their bays.

     

     

     

    Text below from Video Games Player (Fall 1982, page 65)

     

    CALENDAR [Anything not for Atari VCS has been removed from their list.]

     

    AUGUST

    Parker BrothersThe Empire Strikes Back and Frogger.

    U.S. GamesWord Zapper and Towering Inferno.

    TigervisionThreshold and King Kong.

    AtariBerzerk.

     

     

     

    SEPTEMBER

    20th Century FoxFirst four games will be Beany Bopper, Deadly Duck, Worm War I and Fast Eddie.

    U.S. GamesCommando Raid.

    ActivisionPitfall and Megamania.

    Apollo6 new games.

    TigervisionJawbreaker and River Patrol.

    Parker BrothersSpider-man, Amidar, Super Cobra and Reactor.

     

     

     

    OCTOBER

    Mattel's M System debutFrogs and Flies, Lock 'N Chase, Dark Cavern, Sea Battle, Armor Ambush, and Tron: Deadly Discs.

    U.S. GamesMaze Chase, Squeeze Box, and an untitled game.

     

     

     

    NOVEMBER

    U.S. GamesSpace Jockey and Guardians of Treasure.

    AtariDemons to Dragons, Volleyball, and Frog Pond.

    Parker BrothersSky Skipper.

     

     

     

    DECEMBER

    Apollosix new games.

    AtariRaiders of the Lost Ark and Football (new version). [DAHRaiders of the Lost Ark was released in November.]

    CBSWizard of WOR and GORF.

     

     

    JANUARY

    U.S. GamesWeird Bird and Gopher Attack.

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November 1982

 

November 1982

Raiders of the Lost Ark (Atari)

November release (according to my own experience, page 11 of V1N4, and '82 In Review from V1n4).

YouTube   Atarimania   AtariAge   Catalog

AAM V1N4 p.11   AAM V1N4 p.7   '82 In Review   Videogaming Illustrated

 

November 1982

Spider-Man (Parker Brothers)

Best guess (using info from Billboard and Arcade Express).

YouTube   Atarimania   AtariAge   Catalog   Billboard   Arcade Express

 

November 1982

Amidar (Parker Brothers)

Best guess (using info from Billboard and Electronics For Kids).

YouTube   Atarimania   AtariAge   Catalog   Billboard   Electronics For Kids

 

November 1982

Sky Jinks (Activision)

November release (according to Activisions newsletter).

YouTube   Atarimania   AtariAge   Catalog   Activisions

November 1982

On the Radio

"Whatcha Gonna Do" by Chilliwack   YouTube   ARC Weekly Top 40

"It's Raining Again" by Supertramp   YouTube   ARC Weekly Top 40

"Sexual Healing" by Marvin Gaye   YouTube   ARC Weekly Top 40

"Maneater" by Hall & Oats   YouTube   ARC Weekly Top 40

"Dirty Laundry" by Don Henley   YouTube   ARC Weekly Top 40

"Rock The Casbah" by The Clash   YouTube   ARC Weekly Top 40

"You Can't Hurry Love" by Phil Collins   YouTube   ARC Weekly Top 40

"The Girl Is Mine" by Michael Jackson and Paul McCartney   YouTube   ARC Weekly Top 40

"Down Under" by Men At Work   YouTube   ARC Weekly Top 40

"Africa" by Toto   YouTube   ARC Weekly Top 40

November 1982

New at the Movies

Creepshow (November 12)   YouTube

Tex (November 19)   YouTube

November 1982

History

    Text below from Arcade Express (November 7, 1982)

     

    ARCADIA HAS NEW NAME

    Arcadia Corp., the company producing the Supercharger, has chosen its new name. The firm henceforth will be called Starpath Corp. The Supercharger is a cartridge expanding game-play capabilities of the Atari VCS by adding Random Access Memory. Starpath is also marketing a line of games utilizing the expanded qualities of the Supercharged VCS.

     

    Additional venture capital and bank financing totaling $8 million will enable the firm to double its personnel over the next few months, and to gear up to be "a major competitor in the home video game business," says Alan Bayley, President of Starpath. The change of name resulted from confusion with Emerson's Arcadia 2001 videogame, and "because some people thought the name Arcadia suggested that we make games for arcades," according to Bayley. "We needed a name that will allow us to eventually go beyond our present business of making arcade-quality games for the home."

     

     

     

    Text below from Arcade Express (November 21, 1982)

     

    ATARI SUES COMMODORE

    Atari has filed suit against Commodore Business Machines, claiming patent infringements relating to the joystick controller. Atari alleges that the Commodore joystick used with the VIC-20 is an "in-the-mold" copy of the Atari joystick. The Warner subsidiary seeks to halt manufacturer of Commodore's Joysticks and paddles, and to recover all profits Commodore received from sales of the controllers.

     

     

    STICK STAND PUTS NEW JOY IN THE STICK

    The "Stick Stand" manufactured by K-Byte has overcome early problems and is now helping gamers ease "joystick cramps", and possibly even increasing their scores. The "Stick Stand" is a molded base that holds a regular joystick firmly, by snapping it into the device. This provides a wide solid base for the controller. Then an easy-grip "fastball knob" pops onto the end of the joystick. Voila! An easy-to-use controller meant to reduce hand and wrist fatigue, and giving better play action to the arcader. There were some reports of joysticks breaking when the device was first introduced. But K-Byte spokesman John Matthias says there's no problem now. Matthias further reports that the inexpensive (under $10) accessory is selling 7000 units per day.

     

     

     

     

    Text below from Electronics For Kids (January/February 1983, page S19)

     

    A fifth arcade-based game, Amidar, was shipped in November.

     

     

     

     

    Text below from Videogaming Illustrated (August 1982, page 60)

     

    This November, Atari will be releasing a new home videogame based on the hit motion picture Raiders of the Lost Ark. . . .

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December 1982

 

December 1982

River Raid (Activision)

December release (according to Activisions newsletter and catalog).

YouTube   Atarimania   AtariAge   Catalog   Activisions   Designer's Corner   Arcade Express

 

December 1982

Realsports Football (Atari)

December release (according to Atari Age order form and '82 In Review from V1n4).

YouTube   Atarimania   AtariAge   Catalog

AAM V1N3 p.6   AAM V1N4 p.7   AAM V1N4 BC   '82 In Rev.

 

December 1982

E.T. The Extra-Terrestrial (Atari)

December release (according to my own experience, page 3 of V1N4, and '82 In Review from V1n4).

YouTube   Atarimania   AtariAge   Catalog

AAM V1N4 p.3   AAM V1N4 p.7   '82 In Review   To What Degree Do You Love E.T.?

 

December 1982

Vanguard (Atari)

A kid at school let me borrow this game to play during the 1982 Christmas break. I was surprised because the game was new and he barely had time to play it before he let me take it home. By the way, this game kind of snuck in. It wasn't in the November/December issue of Atari Age magazine, then it popped up in the next issue like "Oh yeah, this game also came out in time for Christmas 1982. Hope you didn't miss it." Well, the November/December issue of Atari Age does slightly mention Vanguard in the Captain's Log: "Please don' t call the telephone number listed in Atari Agethat's just for orders. There's nobody there to tell you about games or service . . . or when Vanguard is coming out."

YouTube   Atarimania   AtariAge   Catalog   AAM V1N5 BC   AAM V1N5 p.8   AAM V2N3 Strategy Guide

 

December 1982

Rescue Terra I (VentureVision)

Best guess (using info from Videogaming Illustrated).

YouTube   Atarimania   AtariAge

Filing Date: Nov. 24, 1982   Videogaming Illustrated

December 1982

 

Alien (20th Century Fox)

Best guess (using info from Video Games Magazine).

YouTube   Atarimania   AtariAge   Catalog   Video Games Magazine

December 1982

 

Mega Force (20th Century Fox)

Best guess (using info from Video Games Magazine).

YouTube   Atarimania   AtariAge   Catalog   Video Games Magazine

December 1982

 

Fantastic Voyage (20th Century Fox)

Best guess (using info from Video Games Magazine).

YouTube   Atarimania   AtariAge   Catalog   Video Games Magazine

December 1982

On the Radio

"Goody Two Shoes" by Adam Ant   YouTube   ARC Weekly Top 40

"Shock The Monkey" by Peter Gabriel   YouTube   ARC Weekly Top 40

"Allentown" by Bily Joel   YouTube   ARC Weekly Top 40

"Heart To Heart" by Kenny Loggins   YouTube   ARC Weekly Top 40

December 1982

New at the Movies

Gandhi (December 8)   YouTube

48 Hours (December 8)   YouTube

Sophie's Choice (December 10)   YouTube

The Toy (December 10)   YouTube

Tootsie (December 17)   YouTube

The Dark Crystal (December 17)   YouTube

December 1982

History

    Text below from Billboard (December 4, 1982, page 66)

     

    VID GAME FIRM APOLLO FILES CHAPTER XI

    The Nov 12 Chapter XI bankruptcy filing by Richardson, Tex.-based Games By Apollo is being attributed to pressure for payment from the Company's advertising agency, Benton & Bowles.

     

    The video game software manufacturer owes its agency $2.5 million, a figure representing only half of the year-old firm's total debts. The bankruptcy filing occurred one week after Benton & Bowles obtained a temporary restraining order prohibiting Apollo from disposing of its inventory in any way.

     

    The agency wanted to sell the inventory itself, to pay the $2.5 million debt for ad services. But rather than appear in court to respond to the temporary restraining order, Apollo filed Chapter XI.

     

    Apollo president Patrick Roper has said he expects the company to reorganize and return in smaller form.

     

     

     

     

    Text below from Arcade Express (December 5, 1982)

     

    THREE TITLES FROM ACTIVISION STRESS ADVENTURE & WHIMSY

    Activision will ship three titles in the next quarter that should follow their established route of whimsy combined with action-adventure, a formula that has proved successful for that company in the past. "River Raid", the first game designed by Carol Shaw, requires the gamer to pilot an assault jet over a constantly changing river course, destroying gunships, helicopters, jets, bridges and oil depots. The course features 48 different river sections, sometimes clear and wide, and then so choked with islands that flight corridors shrink to a single wing span. "Spider Fighter" is another first game, this time from designer Larry Miller. A single player uses a bug blaster to dodge hostile arachnids before they steal his crop of fruit. Described as frenetic, a whorl of on-screen activity uses arcade-like features such as bonus points for surviving an insect wave with no loses, and a demonstration mode when the game ends. The third Activision release, "Sea Quest", was designed by veteran programmer Steve Cartwright, who also gave us "Barnstorming" and "MegaMania". The player controls a submarine to locate his team of scuba divers with their treasures. Then the arcader must rescue the divers from man-eating sharks and pirate subs, getting them to surface before the air supply runs out.

     

    "River Raid" will be shipped in December, "Spider Fighter" in January, and "Sea Quest" will follow in February.

     

     

     

     

    ADULT VIDEOGAMES DRAW FIRE FROM ATARI

    The Swedish Erotica adult videogames are the cause of a great deal of controversy, both in and out of the electronics industry. The most recent salvo comes from Atari. The Atari Consumer Division issued a position paper to make perfectly clear its dismay with American Multiple Industries] Mystique, the company marketing the offending titles, saying that Atari does not condone this use of its home videogame technology.

     

    "Atari takes a very dim View of this use of our product. Unfortunately, some individuals take refuge behind certain legal precepts, to the dismay of the majority of the people," according to Michael Moone, President of Atari. Moone further denied Atari's responsibility for the objectional material, adding "To say that Atari is responsible for this occurrence would be as illogical as censoring a camera company because a few people take pornographic photographs."

     

    Atari is so serious about their unhappiness with the situation that they are entering a suit against the distribution and sale of the game cartridges. They want to be certain that the public realizes that the x-rated games are neither produced nor approved by Atari.

     

     

    ATARI SUES COMMODORE

    Atari has filed suit against Commodore Business Machines, claiming patent infringements relating to the joystick controller. Atari alleges that the Commodore joystick used with the VIC-20 is an "in-the-mold" copy of the Atari joystick. The Warner subsidiary seeks to halt manufacturer of Commodore's Joysticks and paddles, and to recover all profits Commodore received from sales of the controllers.

     

     

    LATE BREAKING NEWS FLASH

    Games By Apollo, the Texas-based firm making VCS-compatible cartridges, has filed for Chapter 11 (bankruptcy). This is the first major software company to hit the rocks.

     

     

     

    Text below from Billboard (December 11, 1982, page 8)

     

    PARKER BROTHERS RELEASING 16 NEW GAME CARTRIDGES

    Parker Brothers, the General Mills toy and game manufacturer which successfully launched a video game line in June, plans the release of 16 new cartridges in 1983.

     

    Keyed to movie, comic and arcade licenses, they will be supported with a major advertising program that will reportedly cost the company about $30 million.

     

    In another 1983 direction, Parker will enter the computer software market, hoping to capture a market that is expected to double in size to about $500 million next year, with an anticipated 4.5 million personal computer homes. Parker will offer game cartridges compatible with such computer systems as Atari, Commodore, Texas Instruments and, possibly, IBM and Apple.

     

    Following the introduction of four games since Juneexpected to generate about $75 million in sales by ChristmasParker plans a January release of a second "Star Wars" cartridge, "Jedi Arena," followed by "Revenge Of The Jedi"the next "Star Wars" filmin May and a fourth cartridge based on a similar theme in late summer.

     

    Also due in January is "Super Cobra" and, during the year, such other arcade games as "Reactor," "Sky Skipper" and "Tutankham."

     

    In March, the company will attempt to reach boys and girls ages four and eight with two entries, "Strawberry Shortcake" and "G.I. Joe."

     

    Currently, all Parker cartridges are compatible with the similar Atari and Sears systems, but other systems, including Intellivision, are expected to also be able to play the firm's software.

     

     

    Parker's introductory cartridges were "Frogger" and "The Empire Strikes Back," which the company says have had a combined sales in excess of three million units. A November release consisted of "Amidar" and "Spider-Man."

     

     

     

     

    Text below from Videogaming Illustrated (December 1982, pages 10 and 59)

     

    NEW KID ON THE BLOCK

    Just when you thought it was safe to go into your local video store, briefed on what's coming from Atari and budgeted accordingly, your money is being tempted away by the first games of Spectravision. The cartridges will fit your Atari unit and, one hopes, your budget.

     

    Currently on sale are:

     

    *Gangster Alley, in which the player must gun-down criminals who appear randomly at windows in an abandoned warehouseand at the same time be wary of Nitro Ed, who skulks about the roof of the building dropping grenades. As the game progresses, the player is forced to continue battling from daylight into night.

     

    *Cross Fire, a space game in which the player must destroy the evil Morpuls which have been menacing the planet Tzoris (a Yiddish word meaning "troubles"). Not only must the player liberate the galaxy, but she or he must continually monitor energy and temperature gauges.

     

    *Planet Patrol, a game which sends the player flying across alien terrain destroying enemy bases and dodging missiles. On occasion. the pilot must descend to refuel or rescue fallen allies. As in Gangster Alley, play carries from daylight to darkness.

     

    *Tape Worm, a food hunt wherein Slinky the worm, Spanky the spider. and Beeky the bird all try to eat the player, who is moving about the screen trying to gobble down fruit.

     

    *China Syndrome is the name of a disaster game set in Spectraville, where an earthquake has cracked the core of a nuclear power plant. Players must recover loose particles of radiation, doing so before there is a meltdown.

     

    The New York based company expects to release new games early in 1983, although no plans have been formalized as yet.

     

     

     

     

    Text below from Videogaming Illustrated (April 1983, page 8)

     

    QUITE A VENTURE

    Small videogame companies are taking it on the chin. Astrocade is virtually extinct and Apollo's rise from the ashes of bankruptcy does not seem to be holding.

     

    Yet, in November, Robert Hesler of Grand Prairie, TX, started up a new videogame company called VentureVision. Hester owned an Atari 2600, and founded his company with a starry-eyed, "If they can do it, I can do it."

     

    Using some of Apollo's ex-employeesa programmer and sales personnelhe put together his first release, Rescue Terra I and released it in December. The purpose of the game was to navigate meteor storms, destroy space pirates, battle robots and force fields, and reach the planet Terra I. The game sold well at a modest $19.95 . . .

     

     

     

     

    Text below from Video Games (February 1983, page 34)

     

    In December, Fox shipped its first movie gamesAlien, Megaforce, and Fantastic Voyage. The latter is a direct translation of the 1966 science-fiction classic. In the game, you try to save a dying scientist by guiding a miniaturized submarine through his bloodstream. Combating white corpuscles and other natural catastrophes, you must safely and speedily maneuver yourself to a blood clot lodged near the brain and destroy it.

 

 

 

1982   1983

 

 

 

 

Information Compiled From the Following Sources

Digital Press Library

The Giant List of Classic Game Programmers

I. C. When

Atari History Museum (Atari Historical Society)

AtariGuide

AtariAge

Steve R's Atari 2600 Rarity List

The Numbers

440 International: Those Were the Days (Today in History)

Rock on the Net: The Ark Weekly Top 40 Archives

Internet Movie Database

Wikipedia: List of Years in Television

My family's calendars from 1982 and 1983. We wrote down almost everything back then.

The Billboard Book of Top 40 hits (5th Edition) by Joel Whitburn

The Complete Directory to Prime Time Network TV Shows (5th Edition) by Tim Brooks and Earle Marsh

Book & Video Update newsletter

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